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1.145. openssl

1.145.1. RHSA-2010:0162: Important security update

Important

This update has already been released (prior to the GA of this release) as the security errata RHSA-2010:0162
Updated openssl packages that fix several security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.
The Red Hat Security Response Team has rated this update as having important security impact. Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base scores, which give detailed severity ratings, are available for each vulnerability from the CVE links in the References section.
OpenSSL is a toolkit that implements the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL v2/v3) and Transport Layer Security (TLS v1) protocols, as well as a full-strength, general purpose cryptography library.
It was discovered that OpenSSL did not always check the return value of the bn_wexpand() function. An attacker able to trigger a memory allocation failure in that function could cause an application using the OpenSSL library to crash or, possibly, execute arbitrary code. (CVE-2009-3245)
A flaw was found in the way the TLS/SSL (Transport Layer Security/Secure Sockets Layer) protocols handled session renegotiation. A man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to prefix arbitrary plain text to a client's session (for example, an HTTPS connection to a website). This could force the server to process an attacker's request as if authenticated using the victim's credentials. This update addresses this flaw by implementing the TLS Renegotiation Indication Extension, as defined in RFC 5746. (CVE-2009-3555)
Refer to the following Knowledgebase article for additional details about the CVE-2009-3555 flaw: http://kbase.redhat.com/faq/docs/DOC-20491
A missing return value check flaw was discovered in OpenSSL, that could possibly cause OpenSSL to call a Kerberos library function with invalid arguments, resulting in a NULL pointer dereference crash in the MIT Kerberos library. In certain configurations, a remote attacker could use this flaw to crash a TLS/SSL server using OpenSSL by requesting Kerberos cipher suites during the TLS handshake. (CVE-2010-0433)
All OpenSSL users should upgrade to these updated packages, which contain backported patches to resolve these issues. For the update to take effect, all services linked to the OpenSSL library must be restarted, or the system rebooted.

1.145.2. RHSA-2010:0054: Moderate security update

Important

This update has already been released (prior to the GA of this release) as the security errata RHSA-2010:0054
Updated openssl packages that fix two security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.
This update has been rated as having moderate security impact by the Red Hat Security Response Team.
OpenSSL is a toolkit that implements the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL v2/v3) and Transport Layer Security (TLS v1) protocols, as well as a full-strength, general purpose cryptography library.
It was found that the OpenSSL library did not properly re-initialize its internal state in the SSL_library_init() function after previous calls to the CRYPTO_cleanup_all_ex_data() function, which would cause a memory leak for each subsequent SSL connection. This flaw could cause server applications that call those functions during reload, such as a combination of the Apache HTTP Server, mod_ssl, PHP, and cURL, to consume all available memory, resulting in a denial of service. (CVE-2009-4355)
Dan Kaminsky found that browsers could accept certificates with MD2 hash signatures, even though MD2 is no longer considered a cryptographically strong algorithm. This could make it easier for an attacker to create a malicious certificate that would be treated as trusted by a browser. OpenSSL now disables the use of the MD2 algorithm inside signatures by default. (CVE-2009-2409)
All OpenSSL users should upgrade to these updated packages, which contain backported patches to resolve these issues. For the update to take effect, all services linked to the OpenSSL library must be restarted, or the system rebooted.

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