CentOS 7, no disks detected during Macbook Pro dual boot installation

Issues related to hardware problems
Post Reply
GeorgyBoy
Posts: 3
Joined: 2019/08/02 13:18:37

CentOS 7, no disks detected during Macbook Pro dual boot installation

Post by GeorgyBoy » 2019/08/02 13:56:45

Hi everyone, greetings first of all.This is my first time in this forum and i´m relatively new in linux world, please excuse me if i make a dumb question. I will try to explain my issue as clear as i can.
I am trying to make a dual boot with CentOS in my Macbook Pro a1707, Mid 2017, Mojave OS, APSF file system without luck, everytime Anaconda doesn`t detect any usable partition to install. I`ve tried several methods: I created partitions using THIS guide and THIS one. I used two different USB sticks, one created with Etcher and another created using dd terminal command. Both boots fine,but stuck at the same point, no disks detected. Funny thing: partitions are detected without issue using an Ubuntu USB installation stick.
I`m in a dead end now, any advice will be appreciated.
Thanks in advance.

aks
Posts: 2859
Joined: 2014/09/20 11:22:14

Re: CentOS 7, no disks detected during Macbook Pro dual boot installation

Post by aks » 2019/08/02 17:08:19

Assuming this is your https://support.apple.com/kb/SP756 machine, then you have two PCIe SSD.
You needed to determine the hardware signature to find the driver to use.
If you boot up a linux system (not for installation) and lspci -vvv and look for your (probably) SATA hardware signature.
Once you know what hardware you have, that you'll have to see if a driver is available. Then (possibly) compile that and insert that driver into the initrd system at installation time.

This seems to have more technical specs:
https://everymac.com/systems/apple/macb ... specs.html

GeorgyBoy
Posts: 3
Joined: 2019/08/02 13:18:37

Re: CentOS 7, no disks detected during Macbook Pro dual boot installation

Post by GeorgyBoy » 2019/08/02 20:21:08

aks wrote:
2019/08/02 17:08:19
Assuming this is your https://support.apple.com/kb/SP756 machine, then you have two PCIe SSD.
You needed to determine the hardware signature to find the driver to use.
If you boot up a linux system (not for installation) and lspci -vvv and look for your (probably) SATA hardware signature.
Once you know what hardware you have, that you'll have to see if a driver is available. Then (possibly) compile that and insert that driver into the initrd system at installation time.

This seems to have more technical specs:
https://everymac.com/systems/apple/macb ... specs.html
Thanks you for your answer aks. There are things you told i can barely understand, but i`ll do my best. The specific MBP model is THIS, and I include a couple of screenshots taken from System Report:Image
Image
Image

My MBP have an Apple T1 chip, but AFAIK it only turn on or off a boot password.
I hope some of this info can help you to point me in the right direction. In docs i readed to try this there is no mention on any SATA hardware signature step, but i already know that noone is specifically for dual boot CentOS in a APFS MBP, so i cannot discard any info.
If my knowledge were broader, I would like to investigate what Ubuntu installation has that makes it detect the discs and what CentOS lacks.

GeorgyBoy
Posts: 3
Joined: 2019/08/02 13:18:37

Re: CentOS 7, no disks detected during Macbook Pro dual boot installation

Post by GeorgyBoy » 2019/08/02 22:07:48

Additionally, and only for testing purposes, i am installing CentOS in an external USB 3.0 SDD, and at this moment everything works fine.

aks
Posts: 2859
Joined: 2014/09/20 11:22:14

Re: CentOS 7, no disks detected during Macbook Pro dual boot installation

Post by aks » 2019/08/04 17:45:42

Okay your Mac has an Apple NVME connected SSD called SM0512L. There is only one disk.
You have four partitions (slices) labelled disk0s1, disk0s2,disk0s3 and disk0s4. These are GPT partitions (as required by Apple firmware).
You seem to have Linux installed at the locations labeled LINUXBOOT and LINUXROOT (disk0s3 and 4), but that's a guess based in the labels and others bits. How did those get there then? The files there are available at /Volumes/<LINUXBOOT|LINUXROOT> are are probably browsable in Apple's finder program (or they may not be depending on if they are really mounted or not).
It is "normal" to have a boot partition and then the "real" (or "C: drive" in Microsoft speak) partition in the Linux world (MAC does this too).
If it is the case that the linux partitions are really (and "working") linux partitions, then you just need something like refind (http://www.rodsbooks.com/refind/) to provide a boot environment and allow booting into it.

Given the propritary nature of Apple's hardware and the fact that Redhat/CentOS doesn't change hardware support that much across releases, you may be better off with a different distribution - unless somebody else knows better.

But I don't have any of this hardware (far to cheap to pay the Apple tax), so can't give you any kind of 100% working solution - your Google fu may have better luck (and I didn't look that hard).

If you're not putting your "CentOS on USB" into production, then it'll work for learning and tinkering (and also appears to be the path of least resistance).

Post Reply

Return to “CentOS 7 - Hardware Support”