Centos 7 manual config partitions

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Daz123
Posts: 1
Joined: 2018/11/10 18:54:24

Centos 7 manual config partitions

Post by Daz123 » 2018/11/10 19:49:35

I installed Centos 7 on a blank disk. Whilst doing so I decided to manually configure partitions, which has resulted in a mess as per the picture attached. I chose LVM scheme because that is meant to be good idea but Centos installation has also added a VG automatically with logical volumes for lv_swap, lv_root, and lv_home (sda 3). The ones I added manually are in sda6. I don't know where partitions sda1, sda2, sda4 and sda5 have appeared from. Please could someone explain what has happened here?

Thanks

Daz
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desertcat
Posts: 462
Joined: 2014/08/07 02:17:29
Location: Tucson, AZ

Re: Centos 7 manual config partitions

Post by desertcat » 2018/11/11 05:34:33

Daz123 wrote:
2018/11/10 19:49:35
I installed Centos 7 on a blank disk. Whilst doing so I decided to manually configure partitions, which has resulted in a mess as per the picture attached. I chose LVM scheme because that is meant to be good idea but Centos installation has also added a VG automatically with logical volumes for lv_swap, lv_root, and lv_home (sda 3). The ones I added manually are in sda6. I don't know where partitions sda1, sda2, sda4 and sda5 have appeared from. Please could someone explain what has happened here?

Thanks

Daz


I'm not sure of LV or VG (whatever that is), but I do do CUSTOM Partitioning, where YOU assign the size and name to each partition. I have always used a custom partition scheme. My buddy uses LV partitions and he lets the computer do its own thing and divide the drive up as it sees fit. You are using a hybrid approach which combines both a LV + a Custom Partition scheme.

In general most partitioning schemes assign /dev/sda1 (sd: b.c.d.e.... and so on) to the /boot or /boot/uefi partitions. After that in a LV comes a massive /root might include /home or /dev/sda2 which might be dedicated to swap then /dev/sda3 which has /root and /home. /dev/sda4 does not exist because you then work into "extended" partitions that start at /dev/sda5 and so on into infinity. The most common hybrid scheme the user creates an independent /home partition which may appear as /dev/sda5 or /dev/sda6.

A Custom (non-LV) partition scheme might look like this: /dev/sda1 /boot; /dev/sda2 /root; /dev/sda3 /home [/dev/sda4 marks the beginning of the extended partitions that begin with /dev/sda5] /dev/sda5 /usr
/dev/sda6 /var ; /dev/sda7 /tmp; /dev/sda8 swap. ... or something similar.

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